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YORKSHIRE WILD


A birding blog, with sounds and film


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birdwatching blog.
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Birding In The Mist.

I thought I could hear a metallic sound from inside the mist.
Steve Farley
I got up went to Spurn Point, it was misty the end. Well to be honest that's how it could have been the sea mist was that bad, but it was beautiful, different and interesting. I have a bit of a fascination with sound and when there is little to see and you are focused on listening, sound becomes very important. Myself and Phil drove down past the visitor centre and sat in the car with the engine off just for a couple of minutes.

From the sea mist you could hear, you could hear things that perhaps you wouldn't be able to hear if you had vision or would have ignored at least. We could hear the Brent geese but had no idea where they were, well not strictly true, they were where they always are. Because you couldn't see, you focused on every sound, every little detail within the sound too. We heard very common birds like the Reed Bunting but when you only have the sound you almost doubt yourself as you don't have that second tier of identification and yes I do mean second.

I thought I could hear a metallic sound from inside the mist, the kind of sound that conjures up all kinds of wonderful things in your brain, like "Full English" sausages, eggs and bacon. The metallic sound I had in my head was knives and forks in the Discovery Centre. I told Phil that the mist was getting worse and after his quizzical look he got my drift. Breakfast!

The mist did clear a little while we were inside and although early the wonderful woman did cook us our staple. By the time we were done the light was breaking through the mist and things were on the up. We decided to go back to Kilnsea and start our visit all over again.

We could hear Teal and Wigeon from the roadside and through the binoculars we could just about make out the displaying Goldeneye. There was plenty of Curlew appearing then disappearing as the mist came and went in seconds. All in all this was a different and very rewarding birding experience. It would be great to spend some time birding with a blindfold on, the drive would be interesting but if you managed to get where you were going how many birds could you identify?
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Above and below: These two birds were making rather a lot of noise in the mist, but when it cleared they were silent.
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This was my first Yellowhammer of the year, noisy in the mist and silent in the light. A striking bird.
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Below: Scaup, after Spurn we went to the Humber sailing club to look for the reported Red Throated Diver but we didn't see it but got these amazing Scaup in the different stages of plumage.
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Red Necked Grebe Castle Howard

But our scopes, binoculars and cameras have American Wigeon and Green Winged Teal avoidance systems built in, so we managed to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.
Steve Farley

Myself and Phil Smithson set off quite early to get to Castle Howard and start a full day of birding. Our intention was to see the Red Necked Grebe then move back to the Derwent Valley area starting at North Duffield Carrs. We saw the Grebe and Goldeneye, Goosander plus many other birds and then moved on to North Duffield.

We quickly saw Peregrine Falcon, Buzzard and Marsh Harrier, 1000s of Wigeon, Teal and a few hundred Pintail but our scopes, binoculars and cameras have American Wigeon and Green Winged Teal avoidance systems built in so we managed to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.
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Red Necked Grebe on Castle Howard main lake.
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